Seed Funding

The Center for Population, Inequality, and Poverty awards seed funding to faculty affiliated with the Center.

 

Application Process

CPIP offers its faculty affiliates grants to aid in the development of proposals for external funding. An expectation is that a seed grant will position the faculty affiliate(s) to submit competitive proposals requesting $50,000 or more in extramural funding to support research at UCI. Please submit to the co-directors a brief description of the project, planned uses for the funds, and details about the extramural funding sponsor(s) you are targeting that includes the program's name, allowable budget, deadlines, etc. The typical amount for seed funding is between $5,000 and $10,000. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. Contact the co-directors with questions or to submit your seed funding proposal. 

 

Seed Grant Recipients

 
2024

Charis Kubrin (Criminology, Law, and Society) received seed funding to support a graduate student for a project on "Rap Lyrics and Juror Decision-Making in Criminal Cases: Autobiographical Confessions of Illegal Behavior or Artistic Expression?" ($8,109). 

David Schaefer (Sociology) received funds for a graduate student researcher who is supporting a project investigating questions related to how durations of spells of incarceration in jail are distributed ($5,000).

Kelley Fong (Sociology) received seed funding to pilot a short online survey with educators about the “school-to-Child Protective Services” pathway that will examine perspectives and experiences with CPS reporting ($5,000).

 

2023

Asia Bento (Sociology) and Vellore Arthi (Economics) received funds for a graduate student researcher for their project Investigating Outcomes from Cosigning Relationships: Examining the Influence of Strong Social Ties and Socioeconomic Status Characteristics ($5,000).

Brittany Morey (Public Health) received funds to support a graduate student researcher for a project titled Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Environmental Health Disparities ($5,000).

Kristin Turney (Sociology) received funds to support two graduate student researchers to collect and analyze intensive longitudinal data on the time-varying relational, instrumental, and health consequences of jail incarceration for family members, including parents, siblings, romantic partners, and adult children ($8,161). 

 
2022

Suellen Hopfer (Public Health) received funds for a two-pronged pilot study in preparation for an NIH grant proposal on vaccine misinformation. Some of this seed funding will support a graduate student researcher for two summer months ($10,000).

 
2021

Damon Clark, Rachel Baker, Di Xu (Education) received funds for their project focused on community colleges as part of an IES/NSF proposal ($15,000).

Annie Ro (Public Health) received funds for the "pre-study section mock review" in which faculty read and provided feedback on specific aims of her NIH proposal ($1,000).

Naomi Sugie (Criminology, Law & Society) received funds to support research for a project titled, "From Rights to Votes: An Experimental Study of Text Messaging Outreach to Individuals with Criminal Convictions in the 2020 Election” ($5,000).

Bryan Sykes (Criminology, Law & Society) received funds for his project, Empirical and Epistemological Inquiries into Mixed-Methods Research, as part of an NSF proposal ($5,000).

Bryan Sykes (Criminology, Law & Society) and George Farkas (Education) received funds for a graduate student researcher to clean and link two administrative data sets ($4,355).

Kristin Turney (Sociology) received funds to support data collection about pandemic-related mortality in prisons across all 50 states and the federal Bureau of Prisons ($5,000).  

 
2020

Vellore Arthi (Economics) received funds for a graduate student researcher to work on long-term labor market scarring from recessions as part of an NSF proposal ($5,000).

Tim Bruckner (Public Health) received funds for analyzing the universe of live births, infant deaths, and fetal deaths among NH blacks and NH whites in the US (~65 million records, 1995 to 2018) ($5,000).

Damon Clark, Rachel Baker, and Di Xu (Education) received funds for a graduate student researcher to assist with a proposal related to  earning college degrees and getting college degrees ($5,000).

George Farkas (Education),  Emily Owens and Bryan Sykes (Criminology, Law & Society) received funds for analyzing the disproportionate tendency of students from low income and African American or Latino backgrounds to be incarcerated at relatively young ages, known as The School-to-Prison Pipeline ($5,000).

David Neumark (Economics) received funds for a graduate student researcher to work on machine learning methods to predict work at older ages as part of an NIA proposal ($5,000).

Daniel Parker (Public Health) received travel and research funds to extract primary source health and migration data in East Africa ($4,400).

Annie Ro (Public Health) received funds for a graduate student researcher to clean and analyze health care data on undocumented immigrants in LA county ($5,000).

 

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