Policy Research

 

Naomi F. Sugie

Naomi F. Sugie

Naomi F. Sugie is an assistant professor in the criminology, law and society department in the School of Social Ecology. Her research focuses on issues of punishment and crime, employment, families, and new technologies for research with hard-to-reach groups. Recent studies examine prisoner reentry and the consequences of criminal justice contact, such as arrest, conviction, and incarceration, for employment, mental health, and political participation. Her work also speaks to issues concerning criminal record stigma in hiring and related public policies, such as Ban the Box. In the Newark Smartphone Reentry Project, she created a smartphone application to study job search and employment experiences of men recently released from prison in Newark, NJ. Most recently, she is leading a National Science Foundation-supported study that assesses the recidivism effects of a federal policy that bans welfare for people convicted of drug-related felonies. Her work is published in leading journals in sociology, criminology, and demography, and has been supported by a variety of funders, including the Department of Labor, National Institutes of Health, and National Institute of Justice. Naomi earned a Ph.D. in sociology and social policy, as well as a specialization in demography, from Princeton University.

 


 
Greg Duncan

Greg Duncan

Greg Duncan holds the title of Distinguished Professor in the School of Education at the University of California, Irvine. Duncan received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan and spent the first 35 years of his career at the University of Michigan and Northwestern University. Duncan was president of the Population Association of America in 2008 and the Society for Research in Child Development between 2009 and 2011. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2010. Duncan’s recent work has focused on estimating the role of school-entry skills and behaviors on later school achievement and attainment and the effects of increasing income inequality on schools and children’s life chances. He is part of a team conducting a random-assignment trial assessing impacts of income supplements on the cognitive development of infants born to poor mothers in four diverse U.S. communities. With support from NICHD and a number of foundation, the study – called Baby’s First Years – is the first causal impact evaluation to test the connections between poverty reduction and brain development among very young children.

 


 
Jade Marcus Jenkins

Jade Marcus Jenkins

Jade Marcus Jenkins is an assistant professor at the University of California, Irvine School of Education studying early childhood policy. Her work is multidisciplinary, focusing on issues that are amenable to educational and social policy intervention, using diverse research methods to evaluate programs and understand the mechanisms that promote child and family wellbeing. Jade grew up in New York, and received her B.S. and M.S. from the University of Florida in family, youth and community sciences, and Ph.D. in public policy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After the M.S. program, Jade worked at a quasi-governmental nonprofit in Florida’s early childhood care and education system. This firsthand experience in policy implementation was her primary motivation to pursue a Ph.D. in public policy and specialize in early childhood development to learn how to evaluate and develop policies that provide support for families with young children and reduce poverty in the long-term.

 


 
Damon Clark

Damon Clark

Damon Clark, Associate Professor of Economics, is an economist whose research focuses predominantly on education. One strand of his research examines the determinants of educational attainment. For example, Professor Clark has studied the educational impacts of attending an elite school. Another strand of research examines the relationship between educational attainment and later-life outcomes. For example, Professor Clark has studied the impact of education on long-run health and mortality, and has studied the extent to which the earnings impacts of education can be attributed to labor market signaling. Professor Clark’s research has been supported by the IES, NIH, and the Spencer Foundation and has been published in top economics journals. His current research focuses on school choice. Building on his earlier studies of the impact of choice reforms on academic outcomes, this work is focused on parents’ preferences over schools. One project uses economic theory to study how these preferences shape the impacts of school choice policies. Another project seeks to estimate these preferences by matching data on real school choices with surveys of the parents making these choices.

 

© UC Irvine School of Social Sciences - 3151 Social Sciences Plaza, Irvine, CA 92697-5100 - 949.824.2766