Inequality Research

 

Bryan L. Sykes

Bryan L. Sykes

Bryan L. Sykes’research focuses on demography and criminology, broadly defined, with particular interests in fertility, mortality, population health, mass imprisonment, social inequality, and research methodology. He applies and develops demographic, statistical, and mixed methodologies to understand changing patterns of inequality — nationally and abroad. Professor Sykes is currently collaborating on three projects. The first project assesses how mass incarceration has affected measures of social inequality and demographic processes (fertility, mortality, and morbidity) among subpopulations with the highest risk of criminal justice contact in America, which has led to the development of new demographic methods for multiple-partner fertility; new statistical methods for estimating mortality in differential population environments; and new sampling weights for national surveys that exclude marginal populations. The second project investigates how national, regional, and global patterns of fertility, mortality, morbidity, and injuries have changed over time. The final project is a multi-state mixed-method data collection effort to assess the legal history and social consequences of monetary sanctions across different jurisdictions within the United States, which has led to new sampling methods for mixed-method and dual design studies.

 


 
George Farkas

George Farkas

George Farkas, Distinguished Professor of education and sociology, is a sociologist of education and a fellow of the American Educational Research Association, with many years of experience publishing quantitative, longitudinal studies of educational achievement in reading, math, and science, educational inequality, and evaluations of interventions to reduce such inequality. This work has resulted in more than 120 articles in peer reviewed journals, four co-authored or co-edited books, and more than 20 book chapters. During the past 10 years he has been PI or Co-PI on 12 research projects funded by NIH, NSF, and the DOE. Results from these projects have been presented to the Office of Management and Budget in DC, the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, and have been widely reported by journalistic outlets. Beginning in 1990 he created the Reading One-to-One (R1-1) tutoring program, with college students as tutors, which was the model for President Clinton’s America Reads program. Beginning with the 2016-17 school year he has been involved in a research-practice partnership with the Santa Ana School District. This has included the training of UCI undergraduates to implement the R1-1 program, and evaluation of this and other district initiatives. He is currently working with professors Bryan Sykes and Emily Owens on a project to discover the characteristics of middle and high schools contributing the most students to the school to prison pipeline.

 

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